Your pokémon snapped out of its confusion!

image

(Source: scolipede, via frezgle)

amiagoodperson:

f(z) = 0.75 * (z^2 + 2z) + c, c = e^(i * (t + k))

amiagoodperson:

f(z) = 0.75 * (z^2 + 2z) + c, c = e^(i * (t + k))

(via dermoosealini)

thatssoscience:

I think you’re confused wikicommons… 


Todos chillan de Ben Affleck y nadie se acuerda de los batnipples

thatssoscience:

I think you’re confused wikicommons… 

Todos chillan de Ben Affleck y nadie se acuerda de los batnipples

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

(via physicsphysics)

mathematica:

Mathbusters to the rescue! This really cool “fact” is actually not necessarily true. Just because there are infinitely many sequences of digits in the decimal expansion of \(\pi\) doesn’t mean that all sequences are in it. In a similar sense, just because there are infinitely many rational numbers \(\frac{p}{q}\), and between every two real numbers is a rational number, doesn’t mean that all of those infinite numbers are rational numbers. Infinity’s not very intuitive! 
Mathematicians don’t even know if every digit occurs infinitely often in the sequence of \(\pi\), though it does certainly appear to us so far that the digits are randomly distributed. This randomness, not irrationality, is actually the key to understanding whether or not \(\pi\) contains all possible strings of information.
What’s more, if this randomness characteristic of infinite nonrepeating decimals were actually true, it wouldn’t be the case that just \(\pi\) contains all of this fascinating information to humans. Rather, every irrational number would have this characteristic — and therefore, exactly the same information somewhere hidden in its infinite decimal expansion.
That’s obviously weird enough to think about — but to make things worse, there are a heck of a lot more irrational numbers than rational numbers, so I guess if every infinite nonrepeating decimal had this characteristic, statistically* speaking, every number would contain all the information strings of the universe — including this post, Tumblr’s logo in every possible image format, the exact chemical makeup of every star every born and infinitely many more that weren’t — and, of course by which popular mathematical result this image is probably inspired, all of Shakespeare’s plays.
What’s even weirder still is that since our universe is finite in age and extent, all the information contained in our universe is statistically zero compared to the possible information content of a random, infinite decimal. So while that information is significant to us, it would be quite literally trivial to a being that could conceivably comprehend all of \(\pi\) (or rather, any random infinite decimal) at once.
Anyway, moral of the story is, while this result may seem awesome, it’s a little bit deceiving. But it’s always cool to see people looking at math in interesting ways!
[CJH]
* Statistics usually deals with measurable, discrete things, and rational numbers, so yeah, that’s not really the most accurate word to use here.

mathematica:

Mathbusters to the rescue! This really cool “fact” is actually not necessarily true. Just because there are infinitely many sequences of digits in the decimal expansion of \(\pi\) doesn’t mean that all sequences are in it. In a similar sense, just because there are infinitely many rational numbers \(\frac{p}{q}\), and between every two real numbers is a rational number, doesn’t mean that all of those infinite numbers are rational numbers. Infinity’s not very intuitive! 

Mathematicians don’t even know if every digit occurs infinitely often in the sequence of \(\pi\), though it does certainly appear to us so far that the digits are randomly distributed. This randomness, not irrationality, is actually the key to understanding whether or not \(\pi\) contains all possible strings of information.

What’s more, if this randomness characteristic of infinite nonrepeating decimals were actually true, it wouldn’t be the case that just \(\pi\) contains all of this fascinating information to humans. Rather, every irrational number would have this characteristic — and therefore, exactly the same information somewhere hidden in its infinite decimal expansion.

That’s obviously weird enough to think about — but to make things worse, there are a heck of a lot more irrational numbers than rational numbers, so I guess if every infinite nonrepeating decimal had this characteristic, statistically* speaking, every number would contain all the information strings of the universe — including this post, Tumblr’s logo in every possible image format, the exact chemical makeup of every star every born and infinitely many more that weren’t — and, of course by which popular mathematical result this image is probably inspired, all of Shakespeare’s plays.

What’s even weirder still is that since our universe is finite in age and extent, all the information contained in our universe is statistically zero compared to the possible information content of a random, infinite decimal. So while that information is significant to us, it would be quite literally trivial to a being that could conceivably comprehend all of \(\pi\) (or rather, any random infinite decimal) at once.

Anyway, moral of the story is, while this result may seem awesome, it’s a little bit deceiving. But it’s always cool to see people looking at math in interesting ways!

[CJH]

* Statistics usually deals with measurable, discrete things, and rational numbers, so yeah, that’s not really the most accurate word to use here.

(Source: lets-tess3llate)

goldcucco:

inkster-inc:

mariedileva:

Transparent! The Rainbow Bird   Tumblr / Shirt 

New Shirt on inksterinc

omg!

goldcucco:

inkster-inc:

mariedileva:

Transparent! The Rainbow Bird   Tumblr / Shirt 

New Shirt on inksterinc

omg!

(via alternative-pokemon-art)

ifc:

What do you think the alarm sounds like?

ifc:

What do you think the alarm sounds like?